Appliance Repairs and Sales Tips

Maintenance tips for your appliances

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Posted on in Appliance Repairs
How to Avoid Laundry Disasters!

I know loading the washing machine seems a simple task, but just remembering a few things can avoid potentially expensive disasters!

To start with, check all pockets are empty.  Look for things like coins and keys, especially electronic car keys which are especially susceptible to water damage.

It also pays to do up zippers and make sure all buttons are undone and sleeves rolled down.  The agitation of a washing cycle can cause buttons to tear in their buttonholes, for instance.  To cut down on possible fading turn dark clothes, such as jeans, inside out.

Finally check care labels in case any items need special laundry treatment.

Distribute the clothing evenly and loosely in the machine and avoid overloading.  The largest load of laundry should not take up more than three quarters of the drum.  If using a top loader, do not load clothes above the agitator.

Posted on in Appliance Repairs
Keep Your Oven Racks Clean!

I know that cleaning your oven racks is a time consuming and down-right dirty job but it is one that needs to be done.  

Here are some simple and practical ways of dealing with the chore.

•    Dryer Sheets & Dishwashing Liquid – Line your bath carefully with dryer sheets and put the oven racks on top of them.  Then fill the bath with enough warm water to cover the racks and add half a cup of dishwashing liquid.  Allow to soak overnight and drain in the morning, wiping the racks clean with the dryer cloths.  The bath can then be easily rinsed clean.

•    Baking Soda & Vinegar – Place the racks in the bath without any water in it.  Sprinkle baking soda over them and then pour on the vinegar.  There should be plenty of foaming, which is normal.  When the foaming stops run enough hot water in the bath to cover the racks.  Let them sit overnight and rub clean the following morning with any old cloth.  Rinse thoroughly before replacing the racks in the oven.

•    Dishwasher Soap Bath – Once again, you will be using your bathtub.  This time line it with some old towels and carefully place the racks on them. Pour in enough hot water to cover the racks.  Add a cup of dishwasher granules and leave to soak overnight.  Rinse in the morning and wipe clean with a cloth.

•    Commercial Cleaning Products – nearly all commercial cleaning products produce toxic fumes so make sure to clean the racks outdoors.  Lay down some old newspapers or similar and place the racks on top.  Put on some protective rubber gloves and spray the racks on both sides.  Leave to sit for at least ten minutes and then scrub with an old cloth or rag.  Rinse thoroughly before replacing the racks in the oven.

Kristie Allsopp in Washing Machine Furore!

Kristie Allsopp in Washing Machine Furore!I don’t follow many so-called twitter storms but the reports of one recently may me smile.

Location, Location, Location presenter Kristie Allsopp announced on social media “It’s disgusting, my life’s work is in part dedicated to getting washing machines out of the kitchen”.

The topic arose in response to a comment from someone saying that American work colleagues were confused by the British practice of siting their washing machine in the kitchen.  It seems that in America and many parts of Europe washing machines are located in bathrooms or dedicated laundry or utility rooms.

"Bathroom, hall cupboard, airing cupboard, google tiny laundry rooms", commented Kristie.

However it is not that simple with British homes.  Unless they are built with a laundry/utility room the washing machine seems to be logically situated in the kitchen.  Don’t forget that there are no electrical sockets in UK bathrooms for safety reasons.

The debate went on.  "Really?  We live in a moderately-sized, four-bed semi and couldn't fit a washing machine anywhere other than the kitchen!" remarked one Twitter user.

Attempting to defuse the debate Kristie commented “Please note there is a degree of humour in this debate, no need to take it quite so seriously”.
 
Someone called Nick had an alternative solution.  “I keep my washing machine at my Nan’s house.  Saves her getting the bus to mine”.    

How thoughtful of you Nick!

 

Dealing with Ice Build-Up in Fridges & Freezers

To my mind this is one of the most common problems that occur with fridges or freezers but one that can be readily dealt with.  The visible sign of a problem is the build-up of one of two types of ice.

Most often powdered ice is the problem.  It has the appearance almost of snow and is found in freezers or ice boxes.  The cause is condensation.  Warm air from outside the appliance is somehow getting in and then turning to ice when it meets the cold air inside.

The things to look for are:

•    Door seals not sealing properly
•    Door not closing properly
•    Door seals that are distorted, torn or split

The other type of ice is solid ice and is usually the result of a water leak of some kind.

If it is possible, arrange to defrost the fridge or freezer.  The safest way is to turn it off and let it completely defrost naturally.

Do not attempt to chip the ice off with a sharp implement.  You run the risk of damaging the evaporator which will effectively kill your appliance.  Your warranty will not cover what is described as ‘customer misuse’.

I do not recommend using electrical means to try and speed up the process such as utilising a hairdryer.  Having electricity and water in close proximity can be extremely dangerous.

If you would like us to take a look at your frozen freezer, give our friendly team a call on 01452 730874 and we’ll arrange for an engineer to visit.

Tagged in: cold fridge ice

Posted on in Appliance Repairs
So we Sent the Team on a Course …

Tuesday 9th May saw some of our staff hard at work on a course – a golf course, that is!

We were pleased to support the latest James Hopkins Trust Charity Golf Day and, although our team didn’t win, we had a marvellous day out mixing with other Gloucester business people.  

The event was held at the magnificent Tewkesbury Park Golf and Country Club.  Starting the day with bacon butties, we set to on the impressive 6,500 yard par 72 course.  I reckon our lads deserved their carvery after spending the day battling through woods and avoiding the water hazards.

The James Hopkins Trust is a Gloucester based charity set up in 1989 to care for babies and children under 5 who have life limiting or life threatening conditions.  At present they are supporting 90 children and their families and have helped over 500 children since the charity’s formation.

I am very pleased to say that the day raised just under £10,000 for this fantastic cause.  Our team photo features (left to right) Mike Dowdeswell, Josh Fivash, Paul Fivash & Martin Lea.

You can find out more about the James Hopkins Trust here:

http://www.jameshopkinstrust.org.uk/

Tagged in: charity golf team